Commit 2b820040 authored by aymeric's avatar aymeric

Initial import

git-svn-id: svn+ssh://svn.savannah.nongnu.org/linphone/trunk@1 3f6dc0c8-ddfe-455d-9043-3cd528dc4637
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Makefile
Makefile.in
aclocal.m4
autom4te.cache
compile
config.guess
config.h
config.h.in
config.log
config.status
config.sub
configure
depcomp
install-sh
intltool-extract
intltool-merge
intltool-update
libtool
ltmain.sh
missing
mkinstalldirs
speex
stamp-h1
linphone.spec
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Simon MORLAT (simon dot morlat at linphone dot org) wrotes:
- main graphical program (gnome)
- RTP library (oRTP)
- SIP user-agent library (osipua)
- audio library (mediastreamer), for codec and i/o handling.
- sipomatic, the automatic sip replier, which is often used for testing.
Florian Wintertein < f-win at gmx dot net > wrotes the console version of linphone (linphonec)
in console/ directory.
Aymeric Moizard (jack at atosc dot org) wrotes:
- the oSIP SIP transactionnal stack (not part of linphone)
- some piece of code of the osip distribution have been reused in osipua
- presence information support in osipua
- and contributes to some parts of osipua (digest authentification)
For more information about oSIP, see http://osip.atosc.org
Sharath Udupa is developing the media_api, a usefull library to manage audio and video streams
for basic calls as well as conference.
Sandro Santilli < strk at keybit dot net > wrote enhancements in the
console interface (readline, new commands) and some bug fixes for
the core api.
Bryan Ogawa ( bko at cisco dot com ) sent a patch that made the linphone-0.7.1 release.
This patch fixed several issues in the SIP part while working with proxies.
Koichi KUNITAKE < kunitake at linux-ipv6 dot org > has contributed a patch bringing
full IPv6 support.
The Speex codec is a project from Jean Marc Valin. See http://speex.sourceforge.net for more
information.
The GSM library was written by :
Jutta Degener and Carsten Bormann,Technische Universitaet Berlin.
The LPC10-1.5 library was written by:
Andy Fingerhut
Applied Research Laboratory <-- this line is optional if
Washington University, Campus Box 1045/Bryan 509 you have limited space
One Brookings Drive
Saint Louis, MO 63130-4899
jaf@arl.wustl.edu
http://www.arl.wustl.edu/~jaf/
See text files in gsmlib and lpc10-1.5 directories for further information.
G711 library has some code from the alsa-lib on http://www.alsa-project.org
Icons by Pablo Marcelo Moia.
Translations:
fr: Simon Morlat
en: Simon Morlat and Delphine Perreau
it: Alberto Zanoni <alberto.zanoni@-NO-SPAM-PLEASE!-tiscalinet.it>
de: Jean-Jacques Sarton <jj.sarton@-NO-SPAM-PLEASE-t-online.de>
es: Jesús Benítez <gnelson at inMail dot sk>
linphone-1.0.0:
It seems ipv6 support is "broken". Some help is welcome.
linphone-0.12.0
When compiling with gcc-2.95.4 on debian, an assert fails and cause abort()
in libasound (alsa-lib). When compiling with gcc-3.2, it does not happen.
It seems that asoundlib and linphone must be compiled with the same compiler.
Simon MORLAT
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Installation Instructions
*************************
Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 Free
Software Foundation, Inc.
This file is free documentation; the Free Software Foundation gives
unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
Basic Installation
==================
These are generic installation instructions.
The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation. It uses
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
definitions. Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
debugging `configure').
It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring. (Caching is
disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
cache files.)
If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
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The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
`configure' by a program called `autoconf'. You only need
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a newer version of `autoconf'.
The simplest way to compile this package is:
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Running `configure' takes awhile. While running, it prints some
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=====================
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./configure CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix
*Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
Compiling For Multiple Architectures
====================================
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==================
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==========================
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